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DANR Announces More Than $209 Million for Northeast South Dakota Water and Wastewater Projects

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Wednesday, April 13, 2022
MEDIA CONTACT: Brian Walsh, brian.walsh@state.sd.us
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DANR Announces More Than $209 Million for Northeast South Dakota Water and Wastewater Projects
 
PIERRE, S.D. – Today, the South Dakota Department of Agriculture and Natural Resources (DANR) announced the Board of Water and Natural Resources has approved $209,827,641 in grants and loans for drinking water and wastewater projects in northeast South Dakota. These awards are part of more than $1.1 billion in statewide awards approved by the board today.
 
The $209,827,641 total includes $79,434,200 in grants and $130,393,441 in low-interest loans to be administered by the Department of Agriculture and Natural Resources.
 
“I am pleased to announce this financial assistance is available,” said DANR Secretary Hunter Roberts. “These grants and loans will result in upgraded wastewater and drinking water systems which is good for the users and the environment.”
 
The grants and loans were awarded from DANR’s Drinking Water State Revolving Fund Program, Clean Water State Revolving Fund Program, Consolidated Water Facilities Construction Program, and American Rescue Plan Act (ARPA) to the following:
 
Aberdeen received a $32,426,100 Clean Water State Revolving Fund Loan and a $18,896,900 ARPA grant to make improvements to its wastewater treatment facility. Improvements include upgrades to its main lift station, biofilter process, biosolids thickening and stabilization, biosolids handling, administration building, and other equipment. The loan terms are 2.125 percent at 30 years. These funds along with local ARPA funds will support the project costs.
 
Arlington received a $2,420,443 Clean Water State Revolving Fund Loan and a $1,190,945 ARPA grant to improve its wastewater collection system by replacing 10,200 feet of sanitary sewer. The loan terms are 2.125 percent for 30 years.
 
Arlington also received a $1,267,700 Drinking Water State Revolving Fund loan and a $543,300 ARPA grant to replace approximately 1,800 feet of 4-inch diameter cast iron pipe with new 6-inch PVC pipe and install approximately 2,800 feet of 8-inch PVC pipe. This will provide redundant connection to the north side of the city providing more reliable water system service. The loan terms are 1.875 percent for 30 years.
 
Aurora received a $1,804,888 Clean Water State Revolving Fund loan and a $2,553,971 ARPA grant to replace or rehabilitate approximately 6,300 feet of sewer mains and 32 manholes. The loan terms are 2.125 percent for 30 years. These funds along with local ARPA funds will support the project costs.
 
Britton received a $911,862 Clean Water State Revolving Fund loan and a $504,968 ARPA grant to expand the main lift station which is operating at or over capacity. Additionally, sewer lines will be installed along South main to include residents and businesses currently on septic systems. Clay pipe will be replaced with PVC pipes at various locations in Britton as well. The terms of the loan are 2.125 percent for 30 years. These funds as well as local ARPA funds will support the cost of these projects.
 
Brookings received a $4,000,000 Clean Water State Revolving Fund loan to make improvements to the wastewater collection system on 34th Avenue, which has reached capacity and needs to be upgraded, as well as provide the north end of 34th Avenue with sewer service. Sanitary sewer pipes will be expanded to 24 inches and extended by 1,200 feet, and 16 manholes will be replaced. The loan terms are 2.125 percent interest for 30 years.
 
Brookings also received a $50,963,200 Drinking Water State Revolving Fund loan and a $21,039,300 ARPA grant to construct a new lime softening Water Treatment Facility along 34th Avenue and construct six new municipal wells. The project also includes new 16-inch raw water line, along with a 16-inch finished water line to feed into the distribution system. A 20-inch transmission main to the south main water tower will also be constructed. The loan terms are 1.875 percent for 30 years. These funds along with local cash with support the cost of the project.
 
Bryant received a $1,800,050 Clean Water State Revolving Fund loan and a $708,450 ARPA grant to replace or line approximately 6,000 feet of sewer mains, replace 18 manholes, install one flow meter, clean and televise existing pipes, install storm sewer and five intakes, and perform street repairs. These improvements are necessary to reduce infiltration in the wastewater system. The loan terms are 2.125 percent for 30 years. These funds and local ARPA funds will cover the cost of the projects.
 
Bryant also received a $920,000 Drinking Water State Revolving Fund loan and a $1,152,100 ARPA grant to meet the demands of a growing population. The current drinking water infrastructure consists of cast iron pipes with cracks which contribute to high water loss. To address this, Bryant will replace water mains, install new fire hydrants, and replace valves throughout the system. The loan terms are 1.625 percent for 30 years. This funding in addition to local ARPA funds will support the cost of the project.
 
Clark received a $3,315,316 Drinking Water State Revolving Fund loan and a $4,297,054 ARPA grant to replace asbestos cement pipe and cast-iron pipe throughout the city with PVC, loop dead-end lines, replace old water meters and fire hydrants, and repair the water tower, which has outlived its expected life. The loan terms are 1.875 percent for 30 years. These funds in addition to local ARPA funds will support the cost of the project.
 
Corona received a $78,200 Consolidated Water Facilities Construction Program loan and a $312,800 ARPA grant to install meter pits, then purchase and install meters and check valves in the meter pits. The loan terms are 1.87 percent for 10 years.
 
Lake Preston received a $582,325 Clean Water State Revolving Fund loan and a $2,338,675 ARPA grant to replace or rehabilitate approximately 10 blocks of sanitary sewer and improve the existing storm sewer system by adding inlets and upsizing storm sewer mains. The loan terms are 2.125 percent for 30 years.
 
Lake Preston also received a $431,825 Drinking Water State Revolving Fund loan and a $2,167,175 ARPA grant to replace undersized water mains and install water main loops in the south and southeast portion of the city to improve system hydraulics and water service. The loan terms are 1.875 percent for 30 years.
 
Pickerel Lake Sanitary District received a $805,000 Clean Water State Revolving Fund loan and a $2,158,000 ARPA grant to replace or rehabilitate 13 lift stations within the collection system that are at the end of their useful life. The loan terms are 2.125 percent for 30 years.
 
Volga received a $1,259,776 Drinking Water State Revolving Fund loan and a $902,564 ARPA grant to make improvements to its drinking water system to keep up with increased water use. The city will loop water mains, install 8-inch water mains, add two wells, and install valves, fire hydrants, and necessary appurtenances. The loan terms are 2.125 percent for 30 years. These funds and local ARPA funds will cover the costs of this project.
 
Watertown received a $19,819,800 Clean Water State Revolving Fund loan and a $12,194,200 ARPA grant to upgrade seven lift stations and replace and line existing pipes. Wastewater treatment facility improvements include replacement of the final clarifier and improvements to the primary clarifier; sludge pumps, the recirculation pump, effluent pumping; and biosolids dewatering; and make plant-wide electrical and HVAC improvements. The loan terms are 2.125 percent for 30 years. These funds in addition to local ARPA funds will support the cost of this project.
 
Webster received a $3,338,000 Clean Water State Revolving Fund loan and a $4,065,673 ARPA grant to replace cracked, oblong, and broken clay pipe with PVC sanitary sewer pipes and replace 15 sewer manholes. The loan terms are 2.125 percent for 30 years. These funds along with local ARPA funds will support the cost of the project.
 
Webster also received a $353,000 Clean Water State Revolving Fund loan to address areas of the city with no storm water collection. This project will remove damaged pavement and install storm sewer to drain the water away from the area. Additionally, the project will address a sump pump at a second site to reduce algae growth and ice hazards. The loan terms are 2.125 percent for 30 years.
 
Finally, Webster received a $1,855,956 Drinking Water State Revolving Fund loan and a $2,422,717 ARPA grant to provide additional funds for a previously funded project, which has been affected by much higher than anticipated project material costs. This project allows Webster to replace components of their aging drinking water system including cast iron pipes. The loan terms are 1.625 percent for 30 years. These funds in addition to local ARPA funds will support the project costs.
 
Wessington received a $23,000 Consolidated Water Facilities Construction Program grant for cleaning and televising its wastewater pipelines. This grant along with local ARPA funds will support the cost of this project.
 
Wilmot received a $2,040,000 Clean Water State Revolving Fund loan and a $1,962,408 ARPA grant to upgrade its wastewater collection system. The project includes cleaning and televising pipes, replacing clay collection mains, rehabilitating clay collection mains with cured-in-place pipe lining and replacing 35 manholes. The loan terms are 2.125 percent for 30 years. These funds and local ARPA funds will support the cost of this project.
 
The American Rescue Plan Act provides grants for eligible water, wastewater, storm water, and nonpoint source projects. The state of South Dakota is making a historic investment in infrastructure by dedicating $600 million of American Rescue Plan Act funding for local water and wastewater infrastructure grants.
 
The Consolidated Water Facilities Construction Program, funded in part by revenues from the Petroleum Release Compensation Tank Inspection fee and the sale of lotto tickets, provides grants and loans for water, wastewater, and watershed projects.
 
The State of South Dakota and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency fund the Drinking Water State Revolving Fund Program, which provides low-interest loans for public drinking water system projects. The program is funded through a combination of federal appropriations, loan repayments, and bonds. 
 
The State of South Dakota and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency fund the Clean Water State Revolving Fund Program, which provides low-interest loans for wastewater, storm water, water conservation, and nonpoint source projects. The program is funded through a combination of federal appropriations, loan repayments, and bonds. 
 
The board approved the funding at today’s meeting in Pierre.
 
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